Rehab After Work: How To Keep Your Job and Still Get Help



In today’s world, some people have the ability to take a month or three off and go to rehab and all of their finances and everything will be fine. This makes things a lot easier, when you don’t have to worry about paying bills or maintaining your home, and you can just disconnect and focus entirely on recovery, full-time, instead of thinking about getting to their job in the morning then going to rehab after work.

But for most people, they don’t have that luxury. If you’re in a situation where you’ve decided you want to get help, and you might even have some insurance that’s going to help pay for it, or a local government program, but you still need to keep your rent or mortgage paid and you don’t have enough savings to just stop working for a few months – not to mention the risk of losing your job while you’re gone – there are still options for you.

Deciding to go to rehab is such a positive and important decision, but many people avoid doing it because it’s just not possible for them financially, so they try to tackle the alcoholism on their own, but over time it can take a stronger and stronger grip over them, making it harder to quit and exposing them to all of the negatives that come from drinking.

So, here are some thoughts about rehab after work.

Can You Go To Rehab After Work?

Not all rehab programs involve staying somewhere else. With outpatient rehab, you’ll stay in your own home, you can keep going to work and maintaining the parts of your life that you need to maintain.

Outpatient rehab is a bit less intensive, and is more commonly used by people who don’t have as severe of an addiction to a point where they’re completely out of options. In the most severe cases, inpatient rehab (where you stay at a dedicated rehab clinic) is a better option because they’re able to work with you full-time, but not everybody can take the time off to do that, so outpatient rehab after work becomes a much more accessible option.

Some programs will fit around your life and be more flexible. The best option for you or a loved one can depend on things like your finances, what options exist locally as opposed to inpatient programs, how long you can be away from home for if at all, and the severity of the addiction and what options have been tried in the past.

See also: Will I lose my job if I go to rehab?